The Elections

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donovan
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The Elections

Postby donovan » Tue Feb 09, 2016 10:46 pm

As I watch the New Hampshire returns, the media refers to the Southern States as the SEC states. Is the ACC chopped liver?
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Thu Feb 11, 2016 11:34 am

It is a slur, sir.

Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Georgia are clearly the redneck southern states that they must be referencing, and are clearly the domain of bourbon swilling SEC fans that scream SEC-SEC-SEC while droplets of barbecue sauce spit forth from between the gaps in their teeth.

The ACC states of Florida, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky (split), New York, and Massachusetts are more genteel. In Virginia and North Carolina the football fans dress in oxford cloth and windsor knotted ties, and suavely flip through basketball magazines as their football teams try to make a play that will get them to look up every now and then. I think that they serve Earl Grey at the concession stands as well as finger sandwich trays.

In Boston, the fans quietly finger their rosaries while praying fervently for a rare win. Known universally to Notre Dame fans as "Fredo", the Boston College fan is always wary of the offered boat ride.

No...SEC country was what they were referring to..."THOSE" southern states.
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Re: The Elections

Postby donovan » Thu Feb 11, 2016 1:19 pm

I support the traditions of the South. I may not understand them and certainly do not have the fervor of them, but I recognize they are there and do not stand in judgment of them within the confines of the Constitution of the United States. ( I am a little shaky on the 19th Amendment, but that is digression in its lowest form)

What I do not understand is why entities of the South, such as the ACC do not stand up against the tyranny of oppressors, much as you have done.

I am reminded of Thomas Paine in his opposition to George Washington, fearless in his rebuttals.

“Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.”
Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death." Thomas Paine at various times and places.


You Mr. Billybud are the Thomas Paine of our times to sound the clarion call.
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Fri Feb 12, 2016 7:47 am

I learned, long ago, of the power of insurgency. The SEC may be have the money, the manpower, the weapons, but they still must be watchful of Clemson and FSU setting up the occasional hit and run....Basically, we are them and they know we are outcasts of the same tribe.

I am an Alabama boy by birth, heritage, and general outlook. My mother's people (Scots...Ferguson clan) moved down from North Carolina to the frontier of Alabama in 1810 in time for the Creek War and the Ft. Mims massacre. My ancestors were farmers and river men...and they fought and some died for the Confederacy. I grew up a Bama fan and still cheer against Auburn. My Uncle, cousins, brother, and my sister's boy all went to Auburn. Although I moved to North Florida and went to FSU, and have a darn yankee for a father, I am southern through and through. A son of my mother's side who were part of my upbringing.

Southern in all the best ways. I was given the gift of poetry, blarney and love of language that seems embedded in my Alabama Scots-Irish family. My great aunt was a published southern poet, my grandfather a regular Atticus Finch...his first name was Devotion, a little more off beat than Atticus. He was a man whose soft southern tones and impeccable timing won many a debate. An Alabama man, he was a teller of stories, a master of logic, yet could shoot a charging boar without falter, or make terrific peach preserves. I made my living in law, politics, and policy and am comfortable speaking in front of the legislature...or with a rifle in the woods. It is my heritage, along with the Alabama accent (Montgomery upper class dialect...has some almost British sounds at times).

While I lampoon the stereotypes of being southern, I deeply appreciate our culture. And am proud to be a son of Alabama.
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donovan
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Re: The Elections

Postby donovan » Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:51 am

And I am humbled by knowing you.
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Fri Feb 12, 2016 5:32 pm

And you should be.....
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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Sat Feb 13, 2016 8:01 am

OK Donovan...a little over the top....but, as you can see, I treasure the southern culture and was immensely influenced by my southern family.

I regret that my boy has not had those influences...I was 39 when he was born and he grew up without grandparents, aunts and uncles, and the accoutrements of "family".
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Re: The Elections

Postby donovan » Sat Feb 13, 2016 6:40 pm

There is a cultural difference between the East and the West. Southern culture is defined, regimented, expectations, rules and order. It is part of your social, economic, political and religious order. It is based on the cohesiveness of the people that live there. Nothing wrong with that.

The West does not have that. In fact the settlers of the West were those the did not want that cohesiveness, they wanted to be left alone not only from outsiders but from those that lived in their midst.

I sincerely am jealous of your culture, but in reality, I continually seek a place where I am alone. I am a Westerner.
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:58 am

The Scots-Irish were rugged individualists...they often holed up in hollows and valleys and rural farms and didn't (don't) take well to outsiders and the family was center of their structure.

They were a tough, independent people who eschewed government, and still do. They worked hard, stayed close to the soil and nature and have maintained a persistent and unchanging regional subculture. They are likely to garden and hunt

There certainly are "personality" traits of the Scots-Irish...they are distrustful of government and the reliance on other than family and believe in individualism and self sustainability. They are aggressive and have proven to be fighters and were in the forefront of the forging of new western frontiers.

Here, in my rural western North Carolina locale, I listen to the local music two or three days a week...the Irish laments, the high whine of bluegrass, and the work of local song writers. The importance of the fiddle in music making was interesting. Close your eyes, and you are in a different place and time.

And, just maybe, the fall gatherings down south have been gatherings of the clans...who wear their school (clan) tartans and cheer on their young men as they exchange the tossing of cabers for football.
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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:33 am

In researching genealogy...it surprised me how prevalent was the role of the Scots-Irish in settling Texas...half the counties in Texas are named after a Scots-Irish.

Sam Houston (an Ulster Scot) may be the most famous, along with Crockett and Sam Bowie...my wife's Texas pioneer' family (Glasgow area origins to Ulster to North Carolina) ranched, fought off Comanche raids and lived an isolated life at Indian Springs. They moved from the southeast to the wilds of Texas before the Alamo fell.
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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Mon Feb 15, 2016 1:02 pm

Hard to keep my "Bowies" straight...Sam Bowie is an athlete who played for Portland, David was a rock god, and it was Jim who made the knife famous.
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Re: The Elections

Postby donovan » Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:22 am

billybud wrote:Hard to keep my "Bowies" straight...Sam Bowie is an athlete who played for Portland, David was a rock god, and it was Jim who made the knife famous.


Portland tries to forget Sam Bowie....In the 1984 draft, the Portland Trailblazers drafted Sam Bowie with a number 2 pick. The first pick was center Hakeem Olajuwon . The third pick was Michael Jordan.
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Wed Feb 17, 2016 8:47 am

Passing on Michael Jordan must be one of the all time bad decisions in sports,
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Re: The Elections

Postby donovan » Wed Feb 17, 2016 9:05 am

In hindsight, I think that is correct.
As I age it is hard to tell if I am inspired by reasoned passion or arthritic knees; most likely it is arthritic reasoning.

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Re: The Elections

Postby billybud » Wed Feb 17, 2016 5:23 pm

Kind of like Tom Brady...

Each team picked five other athletes before Brady was taken in round six.
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